Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

The Broad                                        Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

How popular is the new Broad museum? Let’s just say that unless you know someone personally, you won’t get in until sometime 2016. Luckily, that’s what we’re here for!

Named after famous philanthropist Eli Broad, the Broad museum is taking Los Angeles and the art world by storm. Eli had finalized plans to build this expansive 50,000 square foot museum in mid 2010, and its doors finally opened this past September!

Eli Broad decided that he would fully fund this museum, totaling a massive $140 million! The only catch to the Broad is that you have to reserve a ticket in order to enter. Ticket reservation is free, and you can reserve up to 9 tickets per person, but with the soaring popularity of the museum, it’s currently booked entirely until March! What I find even better about all this, is that he set up shop right across the street from MoCA! (Which does have an admission fee.)

Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

Flag – Jasper Johns                                       Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

The Broad’s inaugural installation includes artworks by Jeff Koons, Andy Warhol, Barbara Kruger, and Yayoi Kusama, among others. The inaugural installation is, in my opinion, the greatest collection of contemporary artwork that you can experience.

Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

Infinite Expansion – Mike Kelley                                        Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

However, separate from the artworks that grace the many walls of the museum, the building itself is a work of art. From its outdoor appearance to its many rooms, the Broad is an architectural masterpiece, utilizing 36 million pounds of concrete in its first floor vault alone. The Broad is an all inclusive artwork sitting on the corner of Grand and 2nd street in downtown Los Angeles.

Some of the Broads most remarkable artworks include Balloon Dog by Jeff Koons, and Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room. Standing at 12 feet tall, Balloon Dog is a part of Jeff Koons’ series of sculptures entitled Celebration, which consists of both large sculptures and paintings. I had said once that I needed to see Balloon Dog in my lifetime, and then Eli Broad came along and made it happen! It is a definite must see for anyone interested in paying this museum a visit (and if you weren’t thinking of going, I hope this inspires you!) Another of Jeff Koons’ stainless steel sculptures is Tulips. Just to give you an idea of how massive they are, each of these flowers is almost 7 feet tall, and 16 feet across!

Photo by Angelo Villa

Tulips – Jeff Koons                                                     Photo by Angelo Villa

Photo by Angelo Villa

Balloon Dog – Jeff Koons                                             Photo by Angelo Villa

Photo by Angelo Villa

Tulips – Jeff Koons                                                          Photo by Angelo Villa

Another must see at the Broad is Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Room. Located on the first floor of the museum, the Infinity Mirrored Room is exactly that. Guests are allowed to go in at maximum two at a time for a maximum of 45 seconds, and it’s the experience of a lifetime. Kusama constructs these rooms by paneling them with mirrors and hanging strands of light from the ceiling. When entering, you walk onto a platform that is surrounded by shallow water, so as to establish the infinity effect. This installation requires a separate, but also free, reservation, and can have up to an 8 hour wait on some days! A few of my friends and I were able to experience the Infinity Mirrored Room, and it was inexplainable with words. I cannot express enough that if you have the opportunity in your lifetime to see it, you just have to!

Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

Infinity Mirrored Room, The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away – Yayoi Kusama                                          Photo by Sabrina Sharifi

Before writing this article, I had no idea how I was going to convey the contents of an entire museum to people who possibly haven’t been before, but then I realized that it’s not really something you can do. The point of museums is that you walk through them; that you physically exist in the same room as artworks, and experience yourself in relation to their beauty, and in some cases, their gargantuan size. The most valuable statement and piece of advice I could give about the Broad is that you just have to go there. You just have to feel the care taken into each window of its outer walls. You have to hear your voice travel through the vault and ricochet off the concrete walls. And most importantly, you have to see all the incredible artworks that have been put on a silver platter smack dab in downtown Los Angeles. The Broad is a remarkable museum, and I can’t wait to pay it another visit. Let’s go together!